Tag Archives: fake claims of Irish origins

Cassidese Glossary – Poker

For some time now, some of my on-line friends have advised me to provide a version of CassidySlangScam without the invective aimed at Cassidy and his supporters. In response to that advice, I am working on providing a glossary of the terms in Cassidy’s ludicrous book How The Irish Invented Slang with a short, simple and business-like explanation of why Cassidy’s version is wrong.

Daniel Cassidy, in his etymological hoax, How The Irish Invented Slang claimed that the word poker (the card game) derives from the Irish word póca, which is a borrowing from Middle English and means ‘pocket’ or a bag used for money. Why would you call this particular game ‘pocket’? I’ll let Cassidy explain it to you:

“Poker is a short card game that is played out of your póca (pocket) and against the other gambler’s póca (pocket or purse)… In a poker game the gambler carried all his paraphernalia, a deck of cards and his bankroll, in his back póca (pocket).

The word pocket is a key term in the vocabulary of the poker (póca, pocket) game. The two “hole cards” in No Limit Texas Hold ‘em poker are called pocket cards, two pair is a pocket pair, and two aces are pocket rockets. Poker (póca, pocket) is the ideal name for the democratic card game of the American crossroad. There is no house bank. It is one open pocket against another in the poker (póca, pocket) game.”

You can smell the desperation. And Mississippi gamblers used to have pockets in their coats. And the gamblers carried their cards in their pockets. And they put money in their pockets when they won … So, that proves it! I don’t know much about gambling, but if the concept of pocket is so important to the game of poker, surely the word pocket should be mentioned many times on the Wiki article for poker? (It isn’t mentioned once!)

In reality, while the fine detail is lacking (as it so often is in etymology), there is little room for doubt about the real facts. Poker probably derives from the name of a French card game, Poque (probably through the French gamblers of New Orleans), and this in turn probably has its roots in a well-attested game called Pochspiel which is already found in Germany in the 15th century. Both these games share strong similarities with poker.

 

Gaff

In Daniel Cassidy’s insane and inane book, How The Irish Invented Slang, Cassidy tried to prove that hundreds of words in English derive from Irish.

His methodology was simple: he hunted through Irish dictionaries to find a word which resembled the target word in English. When he couldn’t find anything suitable (which was usually the case), he took two or three Irish words and combined them into a ‘well-known phrase’ which had never been used in Irish, and for which Cassidy was happy to provide a fake definition.

Occasionally, Cassidy found words which seemed a good fit (at least for some of the meanings) but made no attempt to establish whether they were loanwords into Irish or loanwords from Irish to English.

Cassidy claimed that the word gaff meaning a boat-hook comes from the Irish gaf or geaf. However, gaf or geaf really comes from English and English got the word from Provencal  gaf via French.  The word gaffe meaning a blunder, is the same word. A quick search on the free and fully-searchable Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language will confirm that gaf/geaf is not an ancient word in Irish. It is plainly, obviously and clearly a loanword.

Incidentally, the unrelated word gaff meaning a home or a place is from Romani gav.

 

I leabhar amaideach, craiceáilte Daniel Cassidy, How The Irish Invented Slang, rinne Cassidy iarracht a chruthú gur tháinigh na céadta focal i mBéarla ón Ghaeilge.

Bhí a chuid modhanna simplí: chuaigh sé a chuardach i bhfoclóiri Gaeilge le focal a aimsiú a bhí cosúil leis an sprioc i mBéarla. Nuair nach bhfuair sé a dhath (rud a tharla níos minice ná a mhalairt), fuair sé dhá fhocal nó trí fhocal i nGaeilge agus chuir sé le chéile iad le ‘frása coitianta’ a chruthú nach raibh riamh ann i nGaeilge, agus bhí Cassidy sásta sainmhíniú bréige a chur ar fáil fosta.

Ó am go ham, thagadh Cassidy ar fhocail a bhí fóirsteanach i gcosúlacht (maidir le cuid de na ciallanna, ar a laghad) ach ní dhearna sé iarracht ar bith a fháil amach an iasachtaí  a fuair an Ghaeilge ó theanga eile a bhí iontu, nó iasachtaí ón Ghaeilge sa Bhéarla.

Mar shampla, rinne Cassidy iarracht a mhaíomh go bhfuarthas an focal Béarla gaff, a chiallaíonn crúca báid, ón Ghaeilge gafgeaf. Is é fírinne an scéil, áfach, go bhfuair an Ghaeilge na focail gafgeaf ón Bhéarla, agus go bhfuair an Béarla an focal ón Phroibhinsis gaf tríd an Fhraincis.  Is ionann é agus an focal Béarla gaffe, a chiallaíonn botún. Má dhéanann tú cuardach are DIL, foclóir Gaeilge atá saor in aisce agus atá go hiomlán inchuardaithe, beidh tú ábalta a dhearbhú nach focal seanbhunaithe sa Ghaeilge é gaf/geaf. Is léir agus is ríléir gur iasacht atá ann.

Dála an scéil, níl baint ar bith ag an fhocal seo leis an fhocal gaff a chiallaíonn baile nó áit. Is ón Romainis gav a tháinig an ceann sin.