Tag Archives: tiach

Cassidese Glossary – Jack-roll

For some time now, some of my on-line friends have advised me to provide a version of CassidySlangScam without the invective aimed at Cassidy and his supporters. In response to that advice, I am working on providing a glossary of the terms in Cassidy’s ludicrous book How The Irish Invented Slang with a short, simple and business-like explanation of why Cassidy’s version is wrong.

This was originally a term for the act of robbing a drunk. In recent years, it has been used, notably in South Africa, for crimes of gang-rape. Again, Cassidy claims that this is from the Irish tiach, which he says means ‘a wallet, small purse; fig. money’. In fact, tiach means a bag or satchel and is not specifically used to refer to a purse. There is no evidence of it being used to mean money (any more than there is evidence for satchel being used figuratively for money in English slang). It is also quite different in pronunciation from the English jack.

Cassidese Glossary – Jackpot

For some time now, some of my on-line friends have advised me to provide a version of CassidySlangScam without the invective aimed at Cassidy and his supporters. In response to that advice, I am working on providing a glossary of the terms in Cassidy’s ludicrous book How The Irish Invented Slang with a short, simple and business-like explanation of why Cassidy’s version is wrong.

In his work of false etymology, How The Irish Invented Slang, Daniel Cassidy claimed that the word jackpot derives from the Irish word tiach along with the English word pot. As we have seen with the word jack, tiach does not mean money and it sounds nothing like the English word jack.

Furthermore, it is widely accepted that jackpot is a poker term derived from the card, the jack. Follow this link for further details: https://www.etymonline.com/word/jackpot

Cassidese Glossary – Jack

For some time now, some of my on-line friends have advised me to provide a version of CassidySlangScam without the invective aimed at Cassidy and his supporters. In response to that advice, I am working on providing a glossary of the terms in Cassidy’s ludicrous book How The Irish Invented Slang with a short, simple and business-like explanation of why Cassidy’s version is wrong.

The word jack as a slang term for money first appears in the US in the 1890s. There is no agreement about its etymology. Some sources note that jack was used as a term for a small coin in English as early as the 16th century. However, the fact that the term jackpot makes its appearance around the 1880s and derives from poker leaves open the possibility that jack is a back formation from jackpot (which really derives from the card jack – the jackpot was won with two jacks). Wherever jack comes from, there is no reason to believe that it derives from Irish.

Daniel Cassidy, in his etymological hoax, How The Irish Invented Slang, claimed that jack derives from the Irish word tiach, which Cassidy defines as: ‘a small purse, a wallet, a budget; fig. money’. Tiach is an archaic word for a bag or satchel and is pronounced chee-ah or tee-ah (not j’aċ, as Cassidy claims). It sounds nothing like jack and it doesn’t mean money. This claim is entirely false.

 

Jack

Daniel Cassidy, in his atrocious book How The Irish Invented Slang, claimed that ‘jack’, a slang term for ‘money’ and the probable origin of ‘jackpot’, comes from the Irish tiach. Cassidy defines tiach as ‘a small purse, a wallet, a budget fig. money’. Now, there are two common words for a wallet in Irish: sparán (equivalent to the sporran of Highland dress) and vallait. Tiach is not a bag used for money, as far as I know. Furthermore, even if it did mean wallet rather than satchel, why would it figuratively mean money? Do people ask if someone has lots of wallet? They certainly don’t ask if they can borrow some sparán in Irish, never mind tiach!

Then there is the issue of pronunciation. Tiach is not pronounced like jack or jah. It is pronounced (roughly) chee-ah, with the ch of English cheese, or tee-ah in the south, so why would it become jack? (Cassidy didn’t understand Irish pronunciation at all.)

And then there is the fact that jack was a term for a coin in English by the 16th century. It is not completely impossible that an Irish term might have come into English this far back, but it is pretty unlikely.

All in all, Cassidy’s claim is as stupid and as worthless as the vast majority of the claims made in this book.